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Saturday, February 16, 2013

Equestrian of Taste

B&P

Have you heard? Whilst armies march on their stomach, we in the UK have been unconscious galloping gourmets. Cow appears to have been entirely  absent from the food chain, (perhaps  he/she is on a rave  holiday in Ibiza) and has been without our knowledge replaced by Champion the wonder horse. 
I'm only laughing because I buy my meat from the local farm and as a meat eater, I have no prejudice, though I do draw the line at puppies - did you just stop following me
What does make me bridle is the utter deceit and duplicity of the food production industry.
What's the weirdest thing you have ever eaten?
I ate brains in Morocco, just  to show off  in front of the menfolk who wouldn't touch it - still regretting that one and looking for someone to nurse me through bovine spongiform encphalopathy in the years to come.

106 comments:

  1. Oh Tabs, the weirdest thing - goanna, freshly killed by the car in front of us. Yes, it tastes like chicken!

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    1. Claire - you might win an award, that is really weird!

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  2. Oh god. I come from a long line of squeamish offal shunners so basically the weirdest thing I've ever eaten is, I dont know, maybe kangaroo? Tastes gamey...

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    1. Sarah: I saw kangaroo in a shop last week, I'd give it a go.

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  3. But brains are "sweetmeats" and a delicacy, although I couldn't quite get that excited by it. Here you can buy deep fried grasshoppers, (or are they cockroaches?) from street vendors. Once you get over the idea, they're probably quite tolerable, although I have to confess, I haven't quite over the idea. But I have heard prawns referred to as the cockroaches of the sea, so I suppose it's all a question of mindset, and presentation. Raiders of the Lost Ark etc.

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    1. Columnist: Oh no, I don't think I could manage that, they have such ugly faces, we only eat the pretty things!

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  4. Brains (lamb, I hasten to add), tongue (also lamb) and tripe. I don't consider kangaroo at all weird. Interesting that I consider eating offal could be weird, but one of our national emblems isn't. Prepared to try most things, but not seafood, to which I'm allergic.

    And it's also a matter of perspective - how weird are some of the food products on supermarket aisles???

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    1. Erika: you should see the face I'm pulling here, tripe - yeauch and you are absolutely right, I don't trust that vegetarian Quorn product at all.

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  5. A foul-smelling, evil-tasting, nausea-inducing plate of vomitous vegetarian lasagne carefully brewed by my witchy sister-in-law. Because that didn't kill us on the spot, she drove like a maniac on the way home and tried to kill us that way. Hateful.

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    1. witch side of the family? Husband or brother? Can't stop laughing, all I can see is you hissing and spitting, with your tail straight up!

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    2. Husband's side. My brother's ex-wife is like an adult version of Honey Boo Boo! She once slapped me for saying something sarky to her at a family BBQ. I decked her. She was out cold for about 10 minutes and we didn't speak for 4 years. Bliss - wish I'd thought of it sooner.

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    3. Sulky- what fa spectacular family barney, I thought we were a rotten lot!

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    4. LOL Sulky, you always crack me up. I know, what is it with the weird family members??

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    5. Sulky - do you know that with this bronchitis, I have to wait until I'm between coughing fits to read your comments? The laughter you provoke in me, sends me into a such state, that I'm afraid I'm going to crack a rib!

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    6. Oh Sulky I'm convinced you are a long-lost sister.

      The only physical fight Himself and I have ever ever had was when we struggled to be the first to get into our tiny bathroom and get to the toilet FAST at the same time after dinner at his cousin's. Vegetarian lasagne - lethal.

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    7. Wish I had your never SK.. my sister could do with a decking

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    8. laughed out loud- I find some veto food truly revolting too. sam Meat here x

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    9. Sulky, are you sure you're not talking about my sister in law? That story about the lasagna sounds eerily familiar. Maybe she's leading a double life.

      Elizabeth

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  6. Oh not that dramatic - just the beef tartare with the raw egg in southern France. Husband couldn't watch, I choked it back, daugther smacked her way through it!! Still wish I had one of those metal letters...

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  7. Tabitha

    Went to a dinner once where the host liked cooking unusual foods. Have forgotten some of the things but two I remember were crocodile patties (delicious) as an appetiser and later rare kangaroo (not so keen - perhaps because it was so rare). He said he'd once made a dinner where he'd cooked both of our national emblems: emu as well as kangaroo. Nowadays I eat very little meat and have never been fond of offal (except in pate).

    My mother's mother loved tripe and often served it - have always hated it and have never eaten it since childhood when it was compulsory at maternal grandmother's. She was not a lady to be trifled with, quite formidable. I vowed never to be like her with my own grandchildren. But then she was a brave unsinkable woman, widowed quite young and living on the edge of the bush where she had to look after a little bookworm (when her daughter was recovering from TB, originally caught during WWII as an army nurse) who hated most of the food she prepared and was always bringing home stray animals and wandering off into the bush collecting wildflowers; then there were the poisonous snakes taking up residence in the bedrooms, etc. Don't think I could have done it.
    Europeans must be so sick of meat problems, first the dreadful mad cow disease and now this! Some of our English friends went off meat totally - quite understandable. Best wishes, Pamela

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    1. Pamela- the crocodile patties sound excellent, were they also like chicken? My maternal grandmother was similar to yours, widowed with 4 children and went into business, I can barely count to 50.

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    2. Tabitha
      Hard to describe, was a bit like chicken, though I don't think you'd mistake it for chicken. Host was a very good cook and very adventurous in the kitchen. Everything he made was good but the crocodile surprisingly (at least for me) was the highlight of the meal and super delish.
      Yes grandmother was one strong lady with great fortitude, sadly she died in her 60s. To help support her family she was both a skilled dressmaker and a tailoress, could make men's and women's winter coats as well as dresses and jackets. She made beautiful dolls' clothes too. Also very musical, sang in the church choir and was a Sunday school teacher when she was younger. One of her SS students went on to become a quite well known Australian actor way of the past, Ray Barrett. Sadly because she had to be so strong and cope with so much, she wasn't often very affectionate. I was always quite scared of her as a child, though she did teach me a lot about survival and making the best of things. It's more with hindsight that I can appreciate her best qualities. Best wishes, Pamela

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  8. In Nairobi, there's a restaurant that serves wild game in a sort of "mixed grill" fashion. They just keep coming around to your table, and lopping off pieces of meat. Have no idea what most of it was, but it was good, and I like the taste of "gamey" meats. My daughter ate a lot of different insects when she vacationed in Vietnam - not appealing to me at all.

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    1. Do you mean the Carnivore? I think they fed us camel, ostrich and crocodile before we surrendered.

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    2. Yes, Carnivore - couldn't remember the name.

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    3. I can not BUHLIEVE that you both ate at the Carnivore! *stifling giggles* You are both braver than I...

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  9. Umm... weirdest..? Perhaps snakes, brains, sharks, practically every funny form that came from sea, tongues, any and almost every animal, pig heads, even bull´s testicles etc. Basically, if it´s not moving and it´s prepared somehow- I´m on it. But I don´t know if these things are that strange?

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    1. Weird rock star - you need to go on that jungle survival programme, it would be like a dinner date out for you.
      ,

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    2. I´ve lived in a few countries and traveled a lot back in the days. Basically I merrily ate what was given to me.

      I´ve eaten a lot of freaky stuff too but the ones above are pretty much to the " water is wet "- category to me.
      It´s funny how there was this teeeerrrible controversy somewhere where there was horsemeat in some burgers or whatnot. So..? Horses are tasty! I respect the animals and think they are sensible and gorgeous creatures but when their time comes, I´ll be happy to have them on my plate as well.

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  10. Valentine's Day appetizer was duck tongue. Lot's of the little things in an attractive mini pile. Served deep fried (not a spot of grease or oil to be found-bravo) with polenta and candied kumquat. I've also had skate which I rarely see on a menu but I believe is not that uncommon in France (I'm in the US), and alligator which I would love to have again but haven't seen.

    I love trying unusual things, but have yet to try any insects and won't eat horse meat. Beautiful animals. Just couldn't bear it.

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  11. Here in Canada moose is very popular, of course you need to know a hunter, it can't be bought in stores.
    I did eat an ostrich steak once!

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    1. I had a moose burger once at a powwow. Delicious! I guess I should head up north for more. I've never seen it on a menu here in the US.

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    2. I ate caribou in Montreal and it was so good.

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  12. Rabbit. I was 10. I loved it.

    Have YOU stopped following me now?!

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  13. Chocolate covered ants and grasshoppers!

    It was the mid-sixties, an era of 'exotic' foods, and Macy's New York gourmet food department, affectionately known as The Cellar, was creating a stir with foods like chocolate covered insects, alligator meat, rattlesnake meat and the like.

    Well...none of the other food was covered in chocolate, so what's a girl to do? I bought a tin of ants and a tin of grasshoppers(at something like $6 each, not small change at that time) to share with a few friends at work.

    They all enjoyed the tasty treats...until I showed them the labels on the tins. I barely escaped with my life! And yes, it WAS a dirty trick!

    I think if I was hungry enough, I could eat anything that was not still moving. My little adventure with gourmet insects, though, pales by comparison with some of the stories here.

    Cheers and a lovely weekend to all.

    April

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  14. "Quorn a la King" in college buttery was pretty strange. I still have no idea what was in it and I'm not sure that the cook did either.

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  15. Oh, and guinea pig in Peru. Tasted fine, but live guinea pigs were running around the floor of the restaurant as we dined. Instead of napkins, they was a roll of mint green toilet paper on the table - way weirder than the food.

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  16. ... come to think of this, I think it is a very culture- tied issue. Moose and reindeer and hare couldn´t be more common here. But when I set a pot of hot moules natures underneath my guest´s noses, it´s like alien meat to them.

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    1. weird rock star - oh yes, it really is, we eat haggis which would repulse most folk.
      marzipan piglet - yeah I used to eat it all the time but before realising how weird it was.
      April - I could chow down on an ant but the grasshopper is too long and scary looking!

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    2. haggis... yes. I´ve often spent a few good moments trying to come to terms how ANYBODY could or would be capable of chowing down that... thing. Respect!

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  17. Hi Tabitha,

    The most bizarre thing I have ever had to eat was tepezcuintle in Costa Rica when I was a kid. My father worked for Foreign Affairs and we were living in San Jose at the time and were invited to a finca (farm) for a bar -b-que. The house rules when I was young were that if we were a guest in someones home we had to eat at least half of whatever was served and that we couldn't ask what it was before we ate because it was rude. My father said that if others ate it and it didn't kill them then we could certainly have a go as well.

    Imagine if you will my joy when I was told the tepezcuintle was a large rodent from the rainforest, kind of like a rat with no tail. I thought I was eating a roasted piglet!

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    1. Gracie's mom - I googled it oh it's a cutie pie, what a great word.
      Kathy - mint green toilet paper, that's so funny, at least you knew you were getting an authentic one of a kind experience.

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  18. I am a boring eater and a strict vegetarian since childhood. However, I don't mind that people eat meat, I just don't care for it. I always think I am so much happier and better off not knowing about what goes into my food. I don't want to know that mushrooms can have a high maggot content or that eggs(which I don't eat, but will have in a macaroon from time to time)have ,as you once so wittily remarked, a sinister origin.

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    1. Knit Yarns, oh I'v never heard that about mushrooms, oh and eggs, the wiggly white bit - revolting.

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    2. I believe it is only canned, not fresh, but again I try not to think too much about any food.

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    3. Oh- And cheese- one of my favorites. I don't know why I prefer cow cheese over sheep's milk or goat milk cheese. It is all one and the same and equally unsavory when you really ponder it!

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    4. No, no fresh too, KnitYarns. It is why I won't buy morels here in the South of France. Eeee...

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  19. Venison and moose are two that I have tasted but not loved.
    I think it is a despicable practice to dupe the consumer and that horse mets scandal is very unsettling.
    Janet at the Gardener's Cottage might have something to say about this!

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  20. With all the food inspections that go on at restaurants and supermarkets here in Britain, I'm amazed that anyone gets away with anything. I'm not too bothered about the very unlikely possibility that I've eaten horse. I had steak tartare in Paris once, and was never certain what meat I'd eaten there. I've tried rabbit, frog's legs, snails, venison, quail and grew up eating the occasional beef tongue. I've also accidently eaten 'ris d'agneau' which I thought was lamb and rice, but turned out to be 'the laugh of the lamb'. Still don't know what that means...'galloping gourmets' - aren't you a hoot?

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  21. Hostess- venison is one of my favourites, I love the flavour.

    Shelley - we had rabbit all the time growing up, the "laugh of the lamb" how wonderful does that sound, I wonder what it was?

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  22. I'm a tame one here but the most revolting thing I've eaten is liver and onions. BLECH. I don't know how people can force it down!!

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    1. I love liver and onions! I call it lamb's fry

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    2. Me, if it's cooked properly. Caramel ice the onions and then use the same pan to fry the liver, then mix them together. I prefer the organic chicken livers myself. :)

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    3. I think it is the texture that gets me. You two are brave!

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  23. p.s. I forgot another -- Herring. I made a bet with my Dad when I was about 14 that I could eat herring, and I somehow swallowed it down. Ugh. That was nasty. Shudder.

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    1. LR_ Herring is like mother's milk for us Northern Europeans!

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    2. Eastern Europeans too. When my parents and I visited cousins in Poland, they served herring. I somehow managed to avoid eating that and the headcheese.

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  24. Bizarre is relative isn't it? some of my friends cant get their head around banana sandwiches...but for me i ate this cheese in sardinia that has larvae in it - i didn't know - i thought i drank too much bc the crumbs of cheese were moving and i ate it bc my italian friends urged me to do so... all i can say is that it is salty and with that crystally crunch that really good parmesan has. if you didn't know, you would never guess it was larvae.

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  25. I think the weirdest thing I ate were dog biscuits, which I used to resort to eating as a child when my mother refused to buy us cookies or treats to eat after school. Milk Bones were rather acceptable, I thought. However, I haven't felt compelled to eat Pompey's biscuits as I am now master of my own destiny, and if I want to eat a piece of cake, then I shall, dammit! Reggie

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  26. One of my daughters gave me a little stuffed baby rhinoceros with note that said, "Please don't eat me!"

    I was sad the Galloping Gourmet (Graham Kerr) had to change his diet and quit drinking. It was wonderful Julia Child didn't have to do that.

    Pheasant isn't unusual but I was lucky to have it often as a child because my dad shot them at home. Mom told us to watch out for the buckshot because sometimes she didn't find them all. I'm glad I listened because it was lead then.

    I had such a good oyster this week. It must have been in some clean water and really fresh. I know it isn't unusual but it was so good.

    So many oyster beds are gone in the U.S. Also we had bison in great numbers. We had cod and salmon in ridiculous amounts. If it had been managed better all that food would be there to harvest.

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    1. I eat organic bison all the time. It's actually quite tasty. Love salmon, too.

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  27. If it wiggles on the plate, it's not for me. One exception: I always test oysters for freshness with a drop of lemon juice - they need to react or I won't eat 'em.

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  28. My husband was following this story in the Telegraph daily and reading it aloud to me too. The question we both asked, why did they even think to test it in the first place, did someone blow the whistle? Regardless, we are omnivores, have eaten horse meat and wear cordovan shoes so think the fuss is much ado about nothing.

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  29. Oh my goodness, I should have been working on my own post for tonight but honestly, there was no way I could pull myself away from this post until I had read it all!!! Wow. What fascinating responses all around and yes an anthropologist (or sociologist?) would have a field day (ooh bad pun) with this.

    For all of my travelling in odd countries, I was there for work and so I couldn't take the risk of eating everything that I liked. You always have to come back with the story, so if that means passing by that tempting street stall so be it. So I guess my "oddest" would be tapir in the French Amazon, although it wasn't odd in the least under the circumstances and delicious. Although if I didn't eat dog in the boonies of Tibet/China I would be surprised. And this is a beverage but in Ethiopia I had a beer that was based on corn fermented in (human) spit. That was a little freaky. My honey usually wins these types of contests (and trust me photoreporters love them) by saying "bat" (too many bones) but I do believe that Mr. Weird Rockstar would give him a royal run for his money.

    But it is all so relative. I live in the South of France! Oysters were downed at lunch and on offer at the market this morning were bull meat, eels plus many mysterious sea creatures, andoiullettes, brains, tongues and yes a seller that specializes in one thing only...horse meat.

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    1. PS. And silly me, I thought this post was going to be about Hermes riding boots...

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  30. Tim Gunn tells a brilliant story in one of his books about eating out in China. Whilst he is wondering what the large slug thing is, it crawls off and he has to discreetly kill it. He does this by putting his plate on top and leaning down hard. Fortunately for him, the slug sticks to the underside of his plate and he just leaves it there.

    For myself, I have eaten jellyfish whilst on holiday in Japan. Cold jellyfish.
    Harriet.

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  31. The horse thing seems gross at first but why is any grossier than eating a cow or a chicken?

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  32. I have never eaten horsemeat - I might try it if offered but would feel very guilty. Strangest thing I ever tried was beef bone marrow, sucked out of the bone with a straw. It wasn't very tasty and I can't recommend it.

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  33. Since living in France and dining with my French neighbours I have been exposed to all sorts of things such as marrow eaten out of the bone, Andouillette(ugh), snails (overrated, rubbery and tasteless if it was not for the garlic), frogs legs(quite enjoyed those).

    My polite British disposition sometimes means I end up eating something that repels me although I did have a lucky escape from Ortalan, the hunting of which is supposed to be banned but in typical French fashion, it is considered a delicacy so covert Ortalan hunting still goes on. Some friends of ours have a Domaine, the gentleman of the house is a very keen hunter. One evening we were lead into the cellar where we were informed of a special treat, Oh goody I thought, we are going to indulge in a spot of wine tasting. Once down there, there was a strange aroma and we were led to a table and given a large napkin to put over our heads, my partner had sussed what was going on and guessing I would hate it, told our genial hosts I had an aversion to Armagnac, I actually think he told them if I consumed so much as a tiny drop I would go mad.

    (For those that don't know what Ortalan is, it's a tiny bird from the Bunting family. When captured it is put into a small dark box and force fed, when it reaches the desired weight it is drowned in Armagnac and then roasted, you eat the whole thing bones and all! The reason you put a napkin over your head is to savour the wonderful aroma.)

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  34. Do you have to have swallowed for it to qualify?

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    1. I suppose it was a bit of a cop out, seeing as I did not actually swallow! But quite an experience none the less!

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    2. Just looked Ortalan up and realised I have been spelling it incorrectly it is spelt Ortolan. Ortalan is ironically a corporate risk and public safety company.

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    3. Dash - I have always wanted to be invited underneath a hankie to eat an ortolan, I love crunching tiny bones, I'm very envious of your experience.

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    4. Tabitha I had an inkling that this rather underground and ancient gourmet experience would appeal, I only wish you could have had my portion but rest assured it did not go to waste.

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    5. Dash, I'm just sad that it's illegal now in France, the white hankie is to hide the shame from God, or something like that.

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    6. Yes I've heard that also ..force feeding birds .. dreadful ...wait a minute thats pate

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  35. My mother lived in England for a couple of years in the early 50s where horsemeat was regularly on sale.

    No way would I eat a kangaroo I draw the line at eating a macropod.

    In Rome I was taken to a restaurant in a Roman suburb that served ancient Roman food supposedly. Apparenlty I ate bulls testicles ground up into a meat ball. When we arrived at this restaurant everyone stopped eating and stared at us , our Roman friend told us "not only do they know you are not Roman they know you are not Italian." I think it was the absence of lipliner that did it. After dinner all the patrons at this family owned restaurant sang about Che Guevera.

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  36. MEAT STREET The oddest probably salty llama jerky (national animal) inadvertently in Bolivia. The least liked a toss up between BBQd at the beach eel and guasano (worm) tacos in Mexico. The puffy-charred fresh tortilla was delicious, but not the second bite. To be fair I was schooled by a seafood loving and parsimonious Scottish nan who served nose to tail long before it was fashionable, then lived all over the place with polite parentals. So I've tried a bite of many things. Horsemeat is sandwich common in many parts of Europe, especially Holland and Belgium. Yep, the food mafia deceit is horrible, but don't quite understand why U.K. and France consumers aren't as horrified by Turkey Twizzlers and other Meatrix composites?

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  37. The horse scandal reminds me of when I lived in London, just after the Mad Cow scandal. We Aussies would eat Beef all the time. It was the cheapest meat available as all the locals were onto everything else meat wise (including, apparently, Horse), and were still not touching it with a barge pole. We decided it must have be safe by then after all the animals were cleared etc.

    As for weird food, Crocodile and Kangaroo are probably the most exotic. But Kangaroo is not really that strange... it's quite tasty. I do remember eating tongue as a child, and the sensation of the taste buds from it in my mouth. Disgusting. xx

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    1. Dear Tabith/Heidi
      I was visiting England before the mad cow scandal broke, staying with old English friends who refused to let me eat beef when we went out to restaurants. I'd noticed that meals at their home were Scottish salmon or pheasant or other goodies. When I protested that I didn't have any problem with beef they insisted it was very dangerous. I was really surprsied and thought they'd become a bit eccentric but my friend was a psychologist who specialised in treating brain damaged people (she has a Ph.D in psychology from Cambridge) and had been following the medical research and literature on mad cow disease before it became public knowledge. So, very grateful for their advice.

      It seems the main problem with eating horsemeat, the kind which was never intended originally for human consumption, is that these horses are often treated with drugs/chemicals that are dangerous for humans. Probably/hopefully horses bred in France for the table are not treated with these. And yes cattle and lamb and pigs are also treated with certain chemicals and veterinary medicine but it is supposed to be still safe for human consumption. My preference though when buying the little meat we eat is to find organic meat from animals that are not kept in feed lots or other cruel conditions but are allowed to free range in paddocks. It is possible to find butchers who sell this kind of meat, it's just a bit more expensive usually.

      When we lived in Sri Lanka for a couple of years, other expats who were invited to village weddings, way up-country, used to talk about having eaten rat, bat and cat. Didn't ever go to a village wedding! So can't confirm. Just the thought is enough to freak me out.
      Best wishes, Pamela

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    2. Pamela - yes that's exactly the problem with the horse meat, and also meat purporting to be beef being something entirely different. Some pork has been marked as beef.

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  38. I'm not squeamish and luff offal.

    When ever Mr FF and I go to this French place called Montrachet we always order the crumbed brains for entree.

    People do carry on- have you seen what goes into sausage? Or rilettes? or pate?

    Boarding school sorts you out. x

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  39. Wow, what a hoot these comments are! I agree with Sulky some vegan things can be gross, but I am glad I never eat any kind of ground meat...You just never know what you are getting.. It's all scary!

    xo
    Kim

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  40. Amazing post, Tabitha. Coming in late here, but I have eaten crocodile, beautifully cooked, tasted creamy and a bit like chicken (of course!), also emu salted like bacon, and kangaroo in various ways. Could not face snails, frogs or offal, though!

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  41. One person's delicacy is another person's _____.
    You're right, Tabs, the real concern here is the food industry....who really knows what we've eaten? And yes, it IS scary!

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  42. Funny you should post this... I just watched Food Inc. and Farmageddon on Netflix. If you have the chance, I highly recommend these documentaries.

    When I was a teen I was fed a very nice salami while visiting a cousin... After I finished eating it they told me it was made from horse meat. I was very upset, needless to say.

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  43. I have enjoyed the chapulines of Oaxaca and what I gather was monkey in a sketchy spot in Guilin. Could well have been puppy. Personally shot, skinned, cooked and ate an iguana in Guanacaste this last to impress another man's wife, unsuccessfully at first. In the old days I would drive up from Cable Beach to visit, one by one, the conch sheds on New Providence. Never been made sick by any of this. Very resourceful the use of horse in the food stocks of The UK. Who noticed first?

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    1. They have also been flogging pork and calling it beef.
      Love how we both ate food to show off.

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  44. What a crowd! I'm coming back to this when I have more time today, but I am stunned, what an adventurous foodie lot.

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  46. When I was small my dad would often bring home a bag of periwinkles from the fishmongers. At the time I just ate them but looking back it seems so weird to be scooping wee wriggly things out of a shell with a pin and then eating them. I don't think I could do it now!

    The whole horse meat scandal is just ridiculous. Like you I wonder how they got on to in the first place and what else might be out there in the food aisles waiting to be discovered!

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    1. I think someone could taste the difference. Or perhaps someone near the slaughterhouse caught on.

      I had rattlesnake.

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    2. Oh I can't believe that you remember them and the pins! I could never do it, you are much braver than me.

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  47. Let's see. I've eaten rattlesnake, alligator tail, emu meatballs, reindeer meatballs, turtle soup, frog legs, dove, quail, pheasant, wild turkey, venison, duck, rabbit, crawfish, and bison. Oh, and wild boar and cow's tongue. My father had a weird liking for tongue sandwiches, and he would try anything once and wanted me to do the same. I think I have eaten just about every kind of fish in the States and also sampled every type of seafood here as well and many from abroad. Can you tell I am from a family of hunters and sportsmen? ;-)

    In addition to game, fish, and seafood, I have of course eaten lamb, goose, turkey, chicken, cow, and pig. Regarding the latter, I've tried and hated chittlings and drew the line with pickled pigs feet which someone dared me to eat. I think I took a little taste and promptly was too grossed out to eat more. And you never really know what you are eating in Louisiana. All sorts of things make their way into gumbo and cajun dishes. You just eat it and smile and know that is was prepared with love and good seasonings. To that end, when I was in Scotland, I tried haggis which was okay. My friends were watching me as if I would grow a second head afterwards. I didn't understand the big deal people make over it. So what if it's cooked in a sheep's bladder, or that's what I heard. And if you want to get into odd food (odd when you actually think about what you are eating), food that is considered a delicacy, I love escargot.

    I have never, to my knowledge, eaten horse, cat, or dog. My sister once was served mountain oysters and thought she was eating seafood. My parents, though adventurous eaters, were mortified, and my sister never begged to eat with her little friend again. You'll have to google mountain oyster. ;-)

    I'm a proud member of AE (Adventurous Eaters).

    Elizabeth

    P.S. I think I might have sampled brains before, too. So now I know I'm in good company. I was going to say that I draw the line with animals that are pets, but some people keep fish (we had gold fish), others keep rabbits (we had Frisky Rabbit), etc. I don't know if I could eat horse, dog, or cat. I don't think I could. I guess I'm a little neurotic about my pets, and that's starting to move in the direction of "Fatal Attraction" where Glenn Close cooked her lover's daughter's pet bunny. ;-) In truth, I think it's up to the individual's conscience and stomach.

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    1. Elizabeth if God turns out to be a veggie we are all going to hell together!
      Off to google mountain oysters. Is it a masculine thing?

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    2. Yeah, baby, yeah! Most definitely a masculine thing, Tabitha. God is definitely NOT a vegetarian. He's Scottish.

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    3. I actually meant to say he's Scottish AND a Presbyterian. My parents sure thought so. ;-)

      E.

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  48. Rattlesnake cakes-just a reptilian version of a crab cake.

    Does Duck Dynasty air in Scotland? Brilliant show but those folks will eat anything that moves.

    Also, have you heard the news about Maker's Mark? Supposedly they're watering it down to meet demand!

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  49. well, all i can contribute is what i did not eat as offered.
    scene; morocco, guest in someone's home, business
    starter offering; grilled cat
    special guest of honor offering; the silver dome was lifted to reveal the head of a camel, not bad enough? no, i could have one of the eyes
    international incident; moderate
    debra

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  50. When I was in Dublin a couple of weeks ago, I couldn't turn on the news or open a paper without HORSE MEAT staring me in the face. And when I came back to France and told Gregory, he shrugged his Gallic shoulders in that "so what" French way. And now, it's all over the news here! I can't escape it! I'm going nuts!
    And let's see... weirdest thing I've ever eaten... tĂȘte de veau I guess. I'm not a fan, but my husband loves it! (of course he does)

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  51. Horse is neigh good.
    Will be interesting to see how the false advertising/labeling pans out.
    The health issues, horses being given medication not permissible in the food chain, is another interesting facet. Let alone how they've been treated in the abattoir/knackers yard. Having said that, I knew a vet who always took home some offal from the knackers yard for his wife to cook. And when I say knackers yard I mean big bloated carcases, boiling bones etc...and yes, I saw him do it. Nice!

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