Monday, February 13, 2012

Cups Runneth Over



They were the chemical high of the  1960's.
They came without flashbacks and astral tripping yet were later to be put on trial for everything from joint pain to fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue. 
Happy 50th birthday to the silicone breast.


Fifty years ago, Timmie Jean Lindsey, a factory worker from Texas was the first person to have silicone implants sewn underneath her pectoral muscles and so raise her from a B cup to a C cup.

Opportunity just knocked on the psyche of every dissatisfied double A cup woman in the world. And let's not forget those with tubular breasts, asymmetry and the  need for reconstruction. Vanity thy name may be woman but is it so wrong to take advantage of science's leaps and mounds?

The recent PIP debacle in Europe where hundreds of thousands of women have discovered that their bodies are now filled with industrial silicone used to make mattresses rather than medical grade silicone has exposed the poorly regulated manufacturing side of the industry. 

Do such surgeries go against  the Hippocratic Oath? I believe that women  have the right to choose their own destiny  but should surgeons carve up healthy bodies to achieve  an unchallenged image of  the 'perfect' female form? Are we not just pandering to men? Or does it have more to do with advertising filled with impossibly cantilevered bosoms?  All through history fashion has dictated the desired shape of a woman's body: now buttock implants are on the rise.
Surgical Pygmalions: friend or foe?


The Platonic ideal 
for some women.

Monica Belluci - (natural)

Kelly Brook (natural)


Kate Hudson

Charlize Theron

88 comments:

  1. I've had more than my fair share of body distress, over the years, but never once did it occur to me to enlarge my smaller than average breasts. If they'd been WAY smaller, I can't say I'd have been so sanguine. But the routine cutting open of our bodies, to make us look the way we do not, I don't understand it. I wouldn't judge someone else, too much, if they make a different choice. But I'd be prone to ask them, once we had a few drinks in our systems, why? And to ask them, doesn't it bug you to have something embedded that doesn't belong?

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  2. I have considered getting the softball induced bump on my nose fixed so I won't judge someone else too harshly on wanted to change something about themselves.

    I am a 30A and actually like being able to wear a sundress or tank top without a bra. I wouldn't change the size of my chest.

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  3. Ah! I was just going to talk about this on my blog. My flatness has served me well in dance but not so well in the rest of my life. But, this is my God given body for a reason. I can't challenge that.

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  4. Who hasn't, at one time in their life wished at least one feature to be different? I'd like a butt please, one I can keep without a hundred lunges and squats daily. But implants (pun intended)? No thank you.

    I have big boobs and they can be a real PITA trying to get clothing in a proper fit, not to mention men (and occasionally women) staring at my chest. In high school and early college I was quite athletic and used to run for exercise, but I was a lot thinner overall then. Had to leave that behind, there just isn't a bra with enough support and high impact activities are not my friend for the long term.

    The PIP debacle is disgusting. It reminded me of the melamine dog food. Tragic for those who will suffer negative effects.

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  5. Were it not for the surgical risks, expense and pain, I'd go the other way in a heartbeat. Being "blessed" with a G cup makes it harder to find bras and clothes that fit. I've always envied those A's and B's.

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  6. I guess that's why it's called elective surgery. It's like most things in life - if you can pay for it you can have it. I'm now sick of looking at pictures of celeb "natural beauties" who have clearly had work done, but who are still going through the denial stage. Every day I see women who have had some kind of procedure done and the sad thing is, most of them look different but not necessarily better! However, it's their choice and there's no shortage of surgeons who are happy to take the money and cut them open. I don't swoon with delight at my own reflection, but I'm grateful that I have 2 arms, 2 legs etc and so far they still work. I have a certain amount of vanity, but then I just tell myself to stop being an idiot, laugh, and let my dog lick my face ! Dogs don't care what you look like - I sometimes wish people didn't care so much.

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  7. The other thing to remember is that it's not just one surgery - about every 10 years or so, they need to be "touched up." And living in LA, land of the implant, I've seen first-hand how warped and uneven implants get. No way.

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  8. Well. I wish I had some input, but alas I know nothing of the breast. Have never touched a real or fake one. Well, unless you count my chicken cultets for drag! Seems like a lot of work to go back to have the puppies touched up every so many years, no?

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  9. This is always sad to me. I have no issue in this area - am actually a 32f, and like xoxo, have struggled with fit, and now as I near 50, they are racing each other to my bellybutton! But there are many young girls who decide to do this to be "beautiful" or fit in with someone else's sense of beauty and put foreign things in their body... I am watching the grammys and think Adele is gorgeous, but they keep calling her chunky....

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mine are heading under my arms - it's so uncomfortable.

      Delete
  10. As someone who has breast implants, I say - Do what makes YOU happy. Not anyone else. Just yourself.

    On that matter, I wish girls would stop going to surgeons in third world countries who are botching up their breasts. If you want them, do it right and pay the obscene amount of money to a very reputable, skilled and respected plastic surgeon. I am sick of friends saying "Oh, but you can get them done in Thailand for $3,000". Having any sort of surgery is such a risk, and I don't see why people make that risk even higher.

    WMM - Some of us do it so that we can feel that our bodies are complete and in proportion, not to conform to societies ideals of the 'perfect woman'.

    The PIP issue is so terrible and I really feel for all of the women (I think men too as they made PIP pec implants) who are scared feckless right now!!

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  11. It just seems like a bad idea. But I've always had semi proportionate boobs, so what do I know? There are things about my appearance that could be better (less greasy hair, thicker hair, smaller feet) but it is just a body. Clothing, a good bra, a nice haircut... they can all do wonders. Voluntary surgical alteration makes no sense to me. It's sad that so many women feel it necessary, for ANY reason, to surgically enlarge their breasts.

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  12. It's funny because I had a large growth spurt during college where I went from a B to a DD. They don't even go away if I lose weight. I've actually considered downgrading them after I have children. I can see the reason why people want to increase their size, but I always try to warn friends of the down sides of having large breasts, let alone silicone ones.

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    Replies
    1. Interestingly, one often has no need to downgrade their breasts after having kids..it happens on its own. I have many friends that had D/DD breasts that went down to A/B after having kids--most of them nursed their babies, so not sure if that adds to the deflation or not.

      Delete
  13. Having elective surgery for aesthetic reasons seems very selfish to me. Putting yourself at risk to have bigger boobs/a smaller bum/more svelte thighs is unnecessary and dangerous. Imagine how awful it would be for your family and friends if complications arose during the procedure, or worse still, you died? There are enough risks in life without adding plastic surgery to the mix.

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  14. I lost a bunch of weight and it looked like I'd popped out a couple of kids when I was 16. I went from an E to a B and definitely liked the Es better. Implants and a lift improved my body image and I would DEFINITELY do it again in a second. I didn't do all that work to lose the weight to be saggy! Wouldn't do silicone though, saline seems like a much safer way to go. Glad it all worked out with no complications and minimal scarring but realize that many aren't so lucky.

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  15. I'm with the do what makes you happy crowd. Implants, lipo, Botox, or other cosmetic procedures. Whatever floats your boat.

    ReplyDelete
  16. I prefer my women to have natural breasts, for love-making and child-rearing purposes.

    But, up to a certain point, big surgically-enhanced knockers are definitely a sexual turn-on. It's only when one gets one's paws on them that they seem less than ideal.

    A girl friend just told me about a young woman whose fake tits slipped their moorings and fell into her rib cage whilst she was practising yoga.

    Natural is best.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. How do augmented breasts impact on child rearing?

      Delete
    2. Because they're toxic!

      Silicon can pass through breast milk, and the results from that are not attractive.

      All breast implants will have a toxic effect on the patients body: No matter whether they are filled with silicon or saline, the outer casing is made from silicon, and this does not have nice effects on the brain or any other organs. Do some research. But obviously remember that anyone who makes money from this procedure will not tell you the truth. It's just not in their interest!

      'At least two recent reports have focused on clinical descriptions of children whose mothers have had breast implants. In one report, the children, non-randomly selected, exhibited some physical symptoms which included abnormal results from motility studies of the esophagus, recurrent abdominal pain and other gastrointestinal symptoms, and decreased weight-height ratios. The second report describes two children with rheumatic complaints who were breastfed by women with breast implants. To date, neither child has been diagnosed as having any connective tissue disorder.' ...And that's just from one very small web search, and from one report.

      After fifty years of being tested in the human body on real life guinea pigs, implants are seen to have very harmful effects: Siliconised women are experiencing poisoning, infections, and the early development of cancer, immunologically toxic, arthritis, fibromyalgia, scleroderma, connective tissue disorders, and/or immune dysfunction, to name but a few.

      'Yet as early as 1954 an in-house study by Dow Corning, a prime implant manufacturer, found that the silica in silicone has quite a high order of toxicity, according to recently released documentation of that previously suppressed study. In 1956, silicone fluid injected into laboratory dogs migrated to all the major organs; and in 1961, the year the first implants were released, Dow's own internal medical research department reported that silicone leaking from implants is equivalent in toxic effect to direct injections of silicone into the body.'

      I would have thought that any woman with considering this invasive elective procedure would have done very stringent research of her own and looked at this kind of information, then decided what her health/life, and that of her children, was worth.

      Delete
  17. There's nothing wrong with working with a reputable surgeon for a bit of a nip-n-tuck, if that's what you want. Just don't shove stripper boobs where they oughtn't to be, and leave a line or two in your forehead if you're over 40, it looks better that way! And please I beg you to hold off with the trout pout. Not pretty. like kissing Donald Duck. But a little bit here and there? Why not, so long as it is discreet, and done correclty, and tickles your fancy....

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  18. Took me until just a few years ago to finally get my ears pierced if that's indicative of how I feel about that.

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  19. i am a B cup and dont want a larger size,but wouldnt mind a litte more "perkiness".
    i can understand women who get a reduction,but i dont get the enhancement,because the risks are just to much.
    i would be too scared to have a surgery that is not necessary.

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  20. There is no doubt humans likes a bit of body modification, for some reason our society thinks breasts are 'it'. As to the ethics of cutting into a healthy body for a cosmetic procedure, if you consider it a business transaction undertaken with informed consent, it seems the ethics become much less troubling for those involved.

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  21. Wow, is it really 50 years. I think women should do exactly as they want, but some (including my friends) have implants they outsize their frame. I definitely need a little perking up and at the mo rely on the pulley and levers of Victoria Secrets...

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  22. I had a silent rupture and had 6 lymph nodes removed I'm terrified of the thought of silicone in my body and where it has ended up.

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    Replies
    1. Anon, that's awful. Thanks for taking the time to comment on this.I think we will see a lot of this in future with the PIP victims.

      Delete
  23. Hmmm. I can see both sides of the coin. I grew up with A cups and certainly didn't feel very womanly because of it. Then I gained 13 kilos and poof! Hello there. True, NOT a path that I would recommend although it is silicone free...

    I had Botox quite a bit when I was still acting. I had to. This is going to sound wacky but because of several botched dental surgeries when I was young, I have heavy wrinkles in between my eyes and trust me, no one wants to see that up close. It was painless, I went to great docs and it helped me to keep working. No judgement on my part for a woman to do what she wants with her body as long as she is smart about it and is clear about the psycholigical reasons behind the wish to change as well.

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  24. I would never have implants because I just don't want to go through all that just so I can have bigger breasts that people stare at instead of my face!! I am fine with what I have. When I was pregnant, they got bigger and I freaked, I didn't like it, so the size they are now is just fine. I think one should be happy as they are, but I understand in some circumstances the woman just doesn't feel confident and gets them for herself & I think that is when it's ok, when she makes the choice of her own free will and not to grab attention from men or magazines. But, they can be dangerous and need time taken to investigate. I just wouldn't want something like that in my body waiting to go off. But, I do like how they use this for women who have had breast cancer and had a breast removed, it puts them back what was taken away and helps them to feel confident and like a woman again, that is what I like it used for :) xx

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  25. The PIP scandal is just horrible. It's not only affecting women who deliberately chose to have a breast enlargement but although women who had a complete mastectomy after cancer therapy and wanted to go back to normal. Why do we have so strict regulations for pharmaceutical drugs and the medical device regulation is so lax?
    In my honest oppinion everybody is permitted to do with their body whatever they want, lipectomy, breast enlargement, I don't care. But in the same breath I think I'm entitled to exclude these interventions for me. I don't try to talk you out of it but please don't try to talk me into it either.
    Btw I absolutely agree with ADG, if you decide to have surgery go to a specialist, not to Thailand.

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  26. Oh my! The cleavage post seems to have a lot of people up in arms. Ms Curator wrote a tome there...

    May I throw in my C/D-cup's worth? I have always had breasts, to my utter disappointment. I LONG for a 10B cup. You can't go running with breasts. (Not without a LOT of support.) You can't wear certain outfits with breasts. (White shirts, for one. The only white shirts breasty people can wear are the fitted ones.) And you can't really wear a bikini with breasts. Okay, Kim Kardashian did with that purple number, but she didn't really go ALL the way in the water, did she? Some people do like them. English men, for example, are VERY fond of them. And a fair few American men too. (If you get the right Immigration officer at LAX you can breeeeeze through!) But Australian men aren't partial to them. Nor are Scandinavians. I'd happily go under the knife to decrease mine if I could.

    My advice is love what you have. Don't buckle under pressure to change. Small breasts are just as gorgeous as large ones! Truly they are.

    (Whooo.. That's a load off my breast.)

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  27. I am not a huge fan of the overly large breast look, or overly enhanced any look but that is a personal choice and everyone has the right to choose how they want to look whatever that may be lets face it if we were makeup we are enhancing ourselves unnaturally to some level or at least we hope so. Having said that i dont agree with the way surgery and botox is promoted as the same as a shopping trip just because you can afford it and want it does not mean it is without consequence - it can go wrong and you can look a million times worse than you ever imagined, not to mention on the most important point of all - it can destroy your health and that is not worth any vanity, so i would be very very very sure it would be worth that potential risk x

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  28. As a woman...wife, mother, sister, daughter and aunt...who has worked in advertising for more than twenty years, I can see the effect that the media, and especially that of the American film industry, has had on the physiology and physiognomy of women, worldwide. With dire consequences.

    Many comments, and you too Tabs, feel that it is a woman's right to choose what she does with her body, and to an extent I would agree. But not when it comes to non elective surgery for a non life threatening condition, based on dopey egotistical vanity.

    Anything and everything you put into your body has an effect on it. All medication has side effects and contra-indications; and all surgery has a multitude of risks, the most important of which is death.

    It's very sobering to read a comment from someone who has had six lymph nodes removed following implant surgery, and is fearful for her life!

    Why would anyone knowingly put themselves, in this kind of danger? It beggars belief that anyone would consider the size of their tits more important than their health/life, and their family. It really shows what kind of men they want to attract, and just how little they actually value themselves mentally.

    Walk around with what looks like Mickey Mouses ears strapped to your chest and see your perceived IQ fall through the floor. And yes, fake ones are as obvious as the nose on your face.

    I have this to say to anyone considering, or who has plastic tits: Grow up, get a life, and stop being so f*&%$£g vacuous dear!

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    Replies
    1. WOW..seriously? Someone has a very strong opinion and ain't afraid to share it. And that last sentence..what are you recommending those with implants should do/think after reading your comment?

      Grow up? Get a life? Make an appt to have them removed?

      Delete
  29. I've always been reasonably satisfied with my breasts and though I used to do everything I could to make them look larger (push up bras, etc), I never considered surgery. Now I think about why women want really large breasts - to make themselves more attractive to men it does make me think. If I could attract a man by having bigger boobs that I couldn't attract without bigger boobs, would I really want that man in my life? No (in 10' tall letters, NO).

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  30. Each to their own. It's not for me, but I couldn't care less if someone wants to get them done. m

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  31. Phew this has raised the temperature in the room, thanks to everyone who has expressed their opinions. I firmly believe in personal choice but would hope that anyone considering any kind of elective surgery would do thorough research and be prepared for untold consequences down the line.

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  32. I personally would never do it. I like my itty bittys. xo

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  33. I was a late bloomer and somehow, despite languishing with A-cups until I moved to blighty, the Heathrow Injection (http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=heathrow%20injection) left me with D-cups. I miss the in-between B cup days when you didn't have to worry about what to wear, but to be fair they balance out my womanly hips now. So, I suppose my advice to those fancying a bit of help in that dept: move to London.

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    Replies
    1. Ha, I've never heard that term before, I find London so image conscious that it would probably have the opposite effect on me , I used to get non stop criticism about my appearance when I worked there.

      Delete
    2. Same thing happened to me - I was a B cup in my early twenties, now I am a D cup....however I didn't have to move to London, I got married. ha!

      Delete
  34. No general anaesthetic for me as long as it's not essential to maintain my physical health.

    Any cut into my flesh would damage my healthy tissue. Why would I want to do this by choice?

    I can't understand why any woman would want larger breasts They make you look heavier than you are and they are in your way when you run.

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    Replies
    1. Paula: Oh general anaesthetic utterly terrifies me.

      Delete
    2. you know, in Austria there is this famous B-celeb Richard Luger (he invites women with huge breasts to the Ball at the State's Opera).
      His first wife wanted to have a prettier nose and never waked up from general anaesthethic. This is history, but the news were shocking to me. Such a silly stupid death!

      Delete
  35. Hmmmm. I think we're missing the point on this. It's not about pandering to men or dopey egotistical vanity for many women. It's much more basic than that. It is a desire to be normal, to feel like part of the female half of the human race. I will set aside the women with already large breasts who have surgery to obtain even larger breasts. I'm speaking of women with the AAA or AA, or even A and B. For some of them, the feeling of being less of a woman than other women runs deep and has nothing to do with vanity. And this has been going on for a long, long time. It's not a product of modern films and advertising. There have been attempts at breast augmention since the 1890s. There were likely women who wished it were possible before then.

    Like it or not, at least some breast mound is a part of what sets the female body apart from the male. Being a woman with no or very small breasts can feel exactly the same as if the person were missing an arm or an ear. I think we do this topic a disservice by dismissing this as something that defines women as vain or self centered man hunters.

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    Replies
    1. Oh I think for some, I'm thinking our "Essex girls" it's just plan vanity and wanting a bigger cup size but of course, for others it runs much much deeper and indeed has to do with wanting to feel "normal"

      Delete
    2. Define 'normal'.
      I don't think stuffing your body with chemical pillows is normal.

      There are lots of intelligent influential fulfilled beautiful women who are not heavily endowed; and it actually takes more than just breasts to make a woman different from a man...it takes a brain.

      In the 1890's they injected paraffin; in the 1940's they injected engine lubricant, all with horrible effects. Cited also is the impact of the American media on womens desires for larger breasts:

      http://www.breastconsult.com/history-of-breast-augmentation-surgery-before-implants.html

      Delete
    3. Curator, your view point is much different than mine. We can agree to disagree. My point was that for some women - and not a small number - the lack of breasts is a primal disappointment and very much akin to the lack of any other body part.

      I do agree that great harm has been done to women in the quest for larger breasts. I think it should tell you something about the strong desire of some to feel that their bodies look female, that they will take such risks.

      On a related note, there are doctors using fat transfer to achieve augmentation, which uses the body's own tissue and has far fewer possible problems than using foreign matter. The drawback is the limiting factor of how much can be transplanted successfully, so the AA woman looking for a D cup will not be happy with this method. Modest, natural looking and feeling results are possible with fat transfer.

      Delete
    4. Desert Flower, how can we call a cup size B a "lack of breasts"?
      Who made us think that way?

      Delete
    5. I don't know. Good question. Maybe most B's are happy, as opposed to the AAA's among us.

      Delete
    6. I think this is an important point. I'm 21, I'm an A cup and my breasts are simply not going to get any bigger (my mother is an A as well). I've always felt like I was cheated out of puberty and sometimes I do feel less womanly than women with bigger chests. Sometimes I feel like I don't even HAVE breasts.

      Denying women the chance to choose plastic surgery with informed consent seems incredibly paternalistic.

      Delete
    7. Anon, I totally see where you are coming from, but I think most of us are being maternalistic rather than paternalistic. At your age, you would have at least three surgeries ahead of you, expense aside, each brings it's own complication. If I had a daughter that would be my council, but the decision would be hers.

      Delete
    8. I know I've said a lot on the subject, but I feel it's warranted. It saddens me greatly to hear that young women feel that their only physical expression of womanhood is large breasts. How shocking is that!

      I come from a generation that had ladylike virtues instilled from the cradle; we were taught to be intelligent, care for others, take pride in our appearance, and have exemplary manners. It is will great concern for young women that I raise my voice. It's devastating that they see being a woman and feminine typified by large breasts, and one which does not come without consequences for the generations to follow them.

      The more it's deemed 'normal', the more it will happen. What next, three toes to wear pointy shoes? Today large bums and breasts are fashionable. In the 20's and 60's everyone was flat as a pancake. Will you go under the knife every time fashions change?

      If your daughter or mother died on the operating table having breast implants, would you really feel the same way?

      Delete
  36. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  37. great post Tabitha! In the end its all such a personal decision-nature gave me more than I need, but I'm not complaining!

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  38. Just like smoking, we have had evidence about the significant immediate and long-term risks and side effects of silicone implants for decades. Just like smoking, some women will do it, rationalize the reasons, and live with the worry.

    Breast reconstruction after cancer does not always use silicon; DIEP or TRAM flap techniques use abdominal skin, fat and blood vessels (not muscle). A number of women opt not to have reconstruction because of the multiple surgeries involved which may further compromise weakened systems.

    Breast reduction is another matter (one is not inserting a foreign body into the chest) and if I experienced the day to day pain, as some of my friends have, I'd consider it.

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  39. Gosh Kate Hudson looks like a boy! I think women look best with a little something to fill a sweater - something to give one a bit of shape.

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    Replies
    1. I love Kate Hudson, I really like her physique and admire her for not jumping on the bandwagon.

      Delete
    2. Desert Flower: I heard that but she looks the same to me in most pics, either way, wish I had her butt!

      Delete
    3. She did. A very small implant. I just ran onto some before/after bikini photos (where it appears someone's job is to track celebrities in this regard) whilst clicking around a fluffy "soft news" article. And now you can add Cameron Diaz to the list. Again, a proportionate implant (nothing obnoxious) but you definitely notice the difference.

      Delete
  40. i keep waiting for this whole augmentation phase to pass but i don't think it ever will here in southern california. xo janet

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  41. About a month ago a colleague of mine at the bank spent a night with a young woman he picked up in a bar.

    During the proceedings he surreptitiously snapped some photos of her naked.

    The reason he did so was her alarmingly lopsided boob job: one breast up, one down. Literally.

    He texted it to me. It was funny and grotesque at the same time.

    The photo is now doing the rounds in offices in Los Angeles and New York.

    I wish every woman considering breast enhancement surgery could see it.

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    Replies
    1. Although I find most of your posts amusing....to take a picture of a woman's breasts, then text it to a friend , and another friend... speaks volumes, or lack thereof, of your character.

      Delete
    2. LBF didn't do it.
      But God that's awful, I hope she finds out and sues the blighter.

      Delete
    3. This kind of thing just makes me sad :-(. This is why I would never just jump into bed with a random. I'm married, so that wouldn't happen anyway...but oooooph, I can't help thinking about my daughter one day when she grows up. I'm not referring to the boob job; I'm referring to being photographed unaware.

      As to breast implants: I could not get past the thought of a man-made object shoved into my chest. It's just like becoming a bionic woman.

      Delete
    4. You are a foul excuse for a human being, LBF-yes, and your collegue, too. Birds of a feather flock together.

      Delete
  42. The boobs are fine, but I can't wait for my well deserved tummy tuck.

    Bonnie Canada

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    Replies
    1. Bonnie, mine is beyond redemption but ack, who cares?

      Delete
    2. Tabitha... you are stunning.. really... I would give my eye teeth to look half as beautiful as you.

      Bonnie

      Delete
    3. Bonnie, stop that at once! It's all smoke and mirrors, I'll teach you all my tricks.

      Delete
  43. I have never had to think about this as I am happy with my breasts. I nursed two babies and they performed what nature intended. I think women have a choice in our society to do what they want if they can afford it...I just wonder though how much we do because we think that men will be attracted to us more if we have ample cleavage.

    It's quite the topic you've raised here Tabitha.

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  44. My entire life I grew up around women, mostly my mother and aunts' friends, who had "work done" and the severity of the procedure never occured to me until I was older. I have not had anything "done" but my primary reason has been the same as why I didn't get a tattoo as soon as I was of age - I'm pain-and-procedure-averse. Now I'm thankful I left myself without ink for other reasons and I am starting to feel the same about cosmetic surgery. Sometimes it is more that we need to be thankful for what we are given. I'm amazed at what a discussion there is today! Also, don't you need "tune-ups" every decade or so if you do have them done?

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  45. I don't think we'll ever be truly pleased with our body. Or boobs for that matter. It's more important accentuate our positive bits. Easier said than done but I balk at going under the knife for cosmetic purposes unless it's absolutely necessary.

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  46. What a lot of comments, it's taken me half the afternoon to read them in snippets and I should be working!
    I could never understand how a woman could breastfeed with implants, though apparently it is possible. Breastfeeding gives a natural breast enhancement, I loved having a C cup for a year after each of my children.
    I would never consider an implant and I am a natural B. I feel terrible for these women who have silicon in their bodies, how awful.

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  47. The older I get, the more pleased I am with my 'B's. That said, I feel it is an individual choice as long as one has the private health insurance to take care of any unexpected problems.

    As for the ‘nip and tuck’... I have had that done and discussed it on the Hostess of the Humble Bungalow's blog. At a youngish age I had a turkey wattle and bags under my eyes. I always felt self-conscious about it. At the age of 55 I had this taken 'taken care of.' Unless people see the 'before and after' photos, no one noticed the difference except me, and that was the idea.

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  48. The comments here are so interesting. In Brisbane, where I live a lot of women get their boobs done after they have kids. It's quite the trend.

    Although I wouldn't action it, I think if someone wants them, well that's their business.

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  49. It is interesting to look at photographs of celebrities and movie stars of previous generations, before the days of rampant plastic surgery. It shows how much our received concept of "beauty" has evolved, particularly as to the subject of breast size. The new "normal" is abnormally large, if you ask me. Just look at photographs of Marilyn Monroe: her bosoms, which were considered to be lusiously large in her heyday, aren't all that big when compared to the helium-inflated ones routinely seen on starlets today.

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    1. Excellent point.

      As a chap I can report--after years of exhaustive qualitative research and comparative analysis--that helium-inflated tits are not all they are rumoured to be.

      In some cases it's a case of "ho-hum"; in others it's "get the f*ck off me you freak!"

      Natural is best.

      Delete
    2. Oh, thank God we had this report/explanation from a man. Excuse me while I throw up.

      Keep it to yourself.

      Delete
  50. My cup does runneth over and I wish it ran a bit under! I am not a fan of implants, unnatural for sure, but the fear factor should keep women running from the surgeon's knife!

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  51. Your body, your choice. I never wanted breast implants, as I was happy with my "sporty" size A cup. Last year I had a double mastectomy and I am now the not-so-proud owner of C cup breasts(Apparently they don't make A cup implants). I now have to dress completely different and I find it difficult. I am extremely happy to have breasts though, I can't imagine going through the rest of my life without anything(with a mastectomy they take your nipples too).

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  52. If we are in the lucky position to be basically happy with ourselves, normally achieved through loving relationships with ourselves and others, we have no right to judge anyone who would opt for something as extreme as breast augmentation. Anyone who, fully conscious of the risks, turns to surgery, is doing it as a last resort or as a result of a lifelong yearning for something that they are missing. As long as the decision is not taken lightly, I applaud those who have the courage to go for it. After years of yo yo dieting my boobs are around my navel, I just don't have the courage to go under the knife.

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  53. I think it's a personal choice. I wouldn't do it, I'm OK with the way I look from that point if view, but I can understand women who would, if it is really something that would make them feel better about themselves. But they are so many who don't need an implant and do it anyway and end up by looking ridiculous. But when you take this kind of decision you know that there is a risk and that this may affect your health.
    Ada

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  54. I think it's a personal choice, although I would never do it I do have a couple friends who have had it done. One of my dear friends had such a horrible outcome and basically scarred for life. I say why not keep what you have, be proud of what you have. And if you want to go through with it, okay, but at least do proper research.

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  55. I have not read all the replies but I felt I wanted to comment on Monica Belluci. She is the most beautiful woman I can think of but she is not natural:0). No no.

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  56. I fell in love with Kate Hudson on the day I saw her in that yellow silk dress in How to Lose A Guy in 10 days. She rocked no boobs like a champ and looked like a goddess.

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