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Wednesday, December 07, 2011

Waist Not?


I would give my eye tooth to look like this but as I have no idea where my eye tooth is, I'll replace that with one of my  old rusty back  molars.  For me an hour glass figure is the epitome of femininity and as out of reach as it is for Olive Oyl or Roseanne Barr.
 Every morning my work out includes  a torturous assault on my abs with Russian twists, planks and side planks but to no end; my maternal line just doesn't grow us that way. 

Jayne Mansefield

A recent study, sponsored by Playtex, who in 1955 created the feminine equivalent of Opus Dei's cilice - the girdle, has revealed that while bust and bottom size has remained largely static, the average woman's waist has increased by eight inches in the last sixty years and according to WWW, the shape wear industry is now worth a corpulent  $812 billion, with  half of British women set to wear control wear over the Christmas period.



The question is, why have we lost our waists? There could be a number of possible reasons, from genetics to  highly processed Frankenfoods, the Pill or, perhaps, increased stress. Stress can cause high levels of cortisol which increases visceral fat and leads to  women having an android as opposed to gynoid distribution of fat.



On my pinboard there’s a headline from a newspaper which shrieks, “Even a small pot belly can kill!” Some days I feel as if I’m wearing a belt made from glass phials of Anthrax around my waist. One slip and I’m off to meet my maker and it's not my preferred waxy red one.

Adriana Lima

But lo, 
at least it now seems I am not the only one who needs to get waisted.

91 comments:

  1. I might as well top myself right now. You could say I have had a waisted life..... or maybe not

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  2. From the picture I have seen on your blog, you have NOTHING to worry about doll! Now, did you say we have to get waisted?

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  3. Waisting away days and nights on ineffective stupid diets...

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  4. Sophia does look amazing...
    those stats are rather startling!

    I remember when Playtex had that girdle advert that showed a woman gently pressing her tummy claiming that 5 pounds had been erased and the line "look you're suddenly shaplier"

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  5. Oh my goodness. My waist never recovered from having kids, although I don't work at nearly as diligently as I should. Time for some crunches to make up for the munching.

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  6. Oh my, well I am the spawn of a woman who was a US size 00 before I came along. And I am on the other side of the size spectrum! Granted, I do have an endocrine disorder but from working with many specialists from acupuncturists to endocrinologists to nutritionists and dietitians etc, I believe it has much to do with stress but also sugar intake which skyrocketed in the past 100 and especially 50 years. Those low fat diets are a big part of it, yum frankenfoods.

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  7. Ah genetics...

    I few years ago I lost my baby weight and was down to 100 lbs (not on purpose, but it kept falling off) but I still had no waist and still had a little belly... sigh...Some things are not meant to be....

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  8. My waist is 25 inches. Trouble is, my hips and bust are 34 inches on a voluptuous day, so the end result is that I look like a slimmish sausage. Lord KNOWS what will happen when I hit menopause.

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  9. these are some v interesting numbers. i think it has something to do with the genetically modified foods that our diets are filled with. what else could it be?

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    1. I think you are right. We ingest those same hormones that the chickens and cows are fed to make them grow 90 miles an hour.

      Sincerely,
      Deb of NC

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  10. This is easy.

    Let me see. What two enormous, world-changing, people-killing changes have occurred over the last 60 years?

    Oh that's right: women in the workplace and the Pill.

    I would say it's probably a combination of the Pill and increased stress due to professional jobs formerly the preserve of men.

    Feminism, as always, has a lot to answer for.

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  12. Sophia is such a goddess. Though, I have seen nicer photos of Ms Mansfield.

    I also suspect that the increase of sugar and hormone/chemical-enriched foods has led to the explosion in waist size. Or, perhaps its because we no longer wear girdles everyday, and have lost the 'waist training' aspect that resulted from it. Who knows? Thank heavens for Spanx, I say.

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  13. Seriously, Laguna Beach? Feminism causes big bellies? I would suggest that women being forced to stay home and be totally dependent on men might possibly cause more stress than women having jobs and being able to support themselves. Just saying.

    I do find it interesting that I precisely match the modern-day UK woman in the waist & hip measurements (I claim a couple of inches more in the bust.) This from a fairly tall woman who has recently lost quite a bit of weight, but who still intends to drop another 20 lbs. I was trying on an old belt of mine today, and it was still several inches short of fitting...I attributed that to the effects of menopause on my waistline. I can't imagine why pre-menopause women have increased so much in the waist. I do read the Couture Allure blog, and marvel at the tiny waists of the vintage models pictured. Is it the girdles? Or what? I'm quite sure it is NOT because we have jobs now.

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  14. This is all so depressing, it kind of makes me glad that I've let that extra inch or so on to my hips, if only to make my waist look smaller! I do admire your workout routine though!

    xo Mary Jo

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  15. I suspect it's all the carb laden foods they throw at us. If you look at most formulations that say 'low in sodium,' I guarantee you they substituted some for of sugar in there. The worst are the corn syrup solids/glucose fructose, etc. It's an epidemic, with diabetics numbers on the rise.

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  16. Interesting numbers but I think it has more to do with wearing girdles and corsets all day long and a general attention in the culture and fashion to the waist line than with nutritional habits. Love the title of this post but get waisted would have good as well!

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  17. My vote is on soda and stress. But, as others have mentioned, you have nothing to worry about - you're gorgeous!

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  18. Tabitha, you don't look straight up and down like Cameron Diaz and that other model (Ambrossi?) in your post. You come across as very feminine....I'm thinking that perhaps they have broader ribcages than you do.

    I find it so interesting how such different shapes are revered nowadays compared to a few decades ago. I mean, Cameron Diaz and Charlize Theron have long, graceful legs but have quite masculine trunks....whereas Sophia Loren and Raquel Welch have much broader hips along with a small waist.

    I reckon it's just down to different body types being put in the spotlight. Right now broad shoulders, narrow hips and long legs are in vogue. Salma Hayek is an actress of today who has a small waist but her body is just not what is in fashion at the moment. Halle Berry too has a small waist but she is more of a pear shape....men just seem to adore her.

    Well that's my take on the whole thing anyway : -). What an enjoyable post.

    Tracy.

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  19. Sophia famously said she owed her figure all to pasta.

    I have no waist.

    Smock frocks are My Friend x

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  20. I blame the processed foods and the alcohol for the pesky spare tires and muffin tops. I jog mine away. Some days I feel like Forrest Gump, I just keep on running (I'm convinced I can actually outrun the muffin top).

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  21. Jill Ann ~ I said women in the workplace and the Pill have conspired to turn women into Warpigs. Feminism has masculinised women to the extent that many females evolve a manly figure.

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  22. Waist Not ...Want Not!!I too assault my stomach with the famed Russians and planks and atomic twists etc etc. all in the name of washboard abs...when in reality I have abs that resemble an ironing board instead! LOL... P.S. I LOVE SOPHIA!! Glad to see her on your blog! She frequently visits mine too!

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  23. Ha! I blame my Asian genes. Curves in our people is stereotypically nil but very true nonetheless. I have no waist, well I have one but it's certainly not like Sophia's.

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  24. Tracy , yes it's all about the 0.7 waist hip ratio, men are much more attracted to that body shape which is as you say Salma, Halle etc, it's very feminine and fertile.

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  25. WMM: me too, we're cut from the same cloth, after my dad died I was a stick insect - with a belly - my belly is part of the family now, it's not going anywhere.

    Emily, Dancing Branflake, FF: Sophia makes me swoon!

    Jill Ann : yes it's a huge jump in waist sizes, in my mums heyday, many of her friends had 21 inch waists!

    LBF: War pigs - are you listening to Black Sabbath? !

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  26. I think this is less about dieting and more about an interesting general shape change that's happened to women over 50 years.

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  27. What a great post! Very interesting analysis of reasons why our bodies seem to have changed. Something has definitely gone on to create such a different image, however I suppose our perception of beauty has changed too. Fifi

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  28. Get waisted? The answer is chemical.

    We forget that we really are what we eat. And what we eat is mostly shite.
    If you decide to eat processed foods, meat and dairy products, you're ingesting more than you think: For example, all animals kept for slaughter are injected with lots of hormones to increase the size and value of the carcass. When it's processed its further injected with stuff to make it look nicer and last longer on the supermarket shelf. You, eating it will ingest those into your body, thus increasing the size and the value of your carcass too. Same deal with dairy products, plus milk, has been homogenised to make it look more appealing by treating the fat in it; but it also makes it harder, if not impossible to remove from the body.

    LBF is right.
    Women in the workplace and the pill are factors. Stress is a chemical contributor to girth. The chemicals in the pill pass through the body into our water sources and our food chain. The plastic containers we put food and water in leach out œstrogens and other crap. When did women become men, and men become women? I can't imagine any man in the 1950's walking down the street merrily sporting a womens handbag, or packs of 1950's women bar crawling, drunk, fighting, flashing tits and minge, or passed out in a pool of vomit for shits and giggles.

    We have to live...but look more closely at how.
    Sophia says she eats a plate of pasta every day. You can bet she doesn't eat large portions, nor anything with corn syrup, or saccharine, and I can't see her Starbucks in hand, doing abdominal crunches or going to the gym chasing a more masculine morphology a la Cameron Diaz. She does the twist really well though, and walks a lot.

    If we want to look like Sophia, Brigitte and Raquel, we need to live like them.

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  29. Well I have had a waisted life. Although, only yesterday, I noted that as a woman of a certain age, my waist is no longer so pronounced.
    Weird your post turned up now, I am feeling part of the zeitgeist.

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  30. Curator: I agree with you 100 percent.

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  31. I don't believe this, I know heaps of curvy women! This all down to a "study"

    People forget that the population as a whole is ageing, and many women lose their curves as they get older. It makes sense that the 'average' woman has a thicker waist because the 'average' woman is now much older.

    Also who conducted this study?? Is it any coincidence that Playtex has a whole range of "stomach shrinking" garments for sale? Typical that they would play on women's insecurities to make a sale pfft.

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  32. Check out Yale's studies and Pub Med on visceral fat studies over the last 40 years, Playtex have just used it to PR their product.

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  33. I bought my first control pants last weekend after developing a 'dangerous pot belly?!' I'm not sure rolls out of the top and bottom was the desired effect tho.

    My metabolism is rapidly slowing down, but luckily it is also going on my boobs. No bad thing.

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  34. The feminine ideal has shifted in the past 50 years - it's always said that Marilyn Monroe would not be considered to have a great body in the modern era (although that awful Kardashian family seem to be at least partially popular for their hourglass figures, as well as their car crash love lives, so who knows). Someone once blamed gay male fashion designers for the waistless look, as they design clothes that suit models that are basically unusually tall, waistless & bustless coathangers (sort of like cross dressing men really). Certainly I have always had a problem finding clothes that fit with a larger waist to hip ratio. The J Brand gigi's that I have are a size 28 (and I'm 5'4") and gape at the waist, but fit nicely on the hips. Rest assured though, I don't look very Sophia like in my lingerie, more's the pity!

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  35. Smidge, apparently Philippino, Indian and N.Irish women, (so some of us Scots with Gael backgrounds are predisposed to being apple shapes) I've been this shape since I was about 8. We're doomed!

    Heidi: I'd love to look like a Kardashian in a bikini, most models are waistless. My J Brands are the opposite, they fit at my hips and thighs but I can barely fasten the blighters!

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  36. I had a straight up and down body or at least more so and then did full on yoga for a couple of years and got quite the waist - had to stop due to the joys of a bad back but have still maintained a waist - not as small but when i wear circular skirts everyone comments on my tiny waist - they give me hips!! Its all in the fashion darling - my waist is small my hips are too - need that optical illusion - and now i am going to confess to a little secret - since visiting your blog i have (for the first time) wished for a little more uptop - you have a very fabulous figure - hell i just bought a padded bra - havent worn it but i do like to look at myself in it in the privacy of the home - who knows it may even make a trip out - i wonder if Mr will notice ... xx

    http://fashionandfrank.blogspot.com/

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  37. I am 1950s woman hear me roar! No seriously...those are more or less my measurements but I'd love to be taller.

    There's always something! Can we just love ourselves?

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  38. and i forgot - a dolce corset - an alaia dress - hello waist (goodbye wallet) xx

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  39. I was 'blessed' with Schwarzeneggrian shoulders. And ribcage of a bloomin' pitbull. And waist is indeed 'waist not'. Ehh, bugger...At least I have fat to store, wherever it wants to be stored.About a billon of ppl doesn't really worry about THAT.

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  40. I totally am blaming the stress/cortisol thing! xo

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  41. Wow! Those numbers were pretty scary.

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  42. Hope this doesn't end our sisters in cradle robbing friendship but, I am actually blessed with one of those small waists. Still didn't stop me from spending quite a bit of time last night mentally launching my holiday "ana" plan. My waist may be tiny but, my butt ain't...XXOO

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  43. I'm with Curator and Janet, it's the shite we eat and the modified foods, oh and as Rose mentioned the fructose in everything.
    I measure 32-26-36 so with a super padded bra I can be like the dames of old. It's hard to find a bra with that much padding! ;)

    What about lifting weights? Has that given Cameron Diaz her thick trunk and wide shoulders?

    Very interesting anyway Tabs, especially as it seems this is a permanent change.

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  44. Dani: Good point, Adriana is very thick through the trunk too, most models are, they are all genetically thin but then define that further with weights etc, so that may explain their torsos. Oh wow, what amazing measurements - you horror!

    S.I.V: It's over.

    LSS: It's quite a jump, diabetes, high blood pressure here we come.


    D: I know, I react very badly to stress but then again I've been the same shape all my life so it's genetics in my case I grudgingly suppose.

    F&F: Oh that's so funny, both of my sisters have had breast reductions and my mum would have loved to have done the same, she thinks they are nothing but a curse.

    Y:"Ribcage of a pit bull" is my laugh of the day!

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  45. Thank you for posting the last photo! In my eyes, the Victoria's Secret models are so overrated. They are not feminine at all to look at.

    What I read is that the average hip would be wide enough to meet the perfect hour glass ratio with the given waist (larger waist+larger hips+larger bust = hour glass) But the bust is too small.

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  46. Paula: I agree, I don't find their physiques at all womanly.
    I think the problem is that when a woman has a 34 inch waist or over, it takes her into high risk for type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, certain cancers; visceral fat is very unhealthy. Apple fat distribution has many more risks associated with it than pear shape distribution, weight doesn't indicate much but waist measurement is becoming more important than our BMI now.

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  47. I read a book some years ago called The Apples & Pears Diet which was all about visceral fat. It terrified me so much because the life expectancy of us "Apples" is reduced considerably in comparison with our "Beyonce Booty" friends. I think it's time for me to re-read this book again!

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  48. yep. stress, meds and food. we need clean food, sleep and peace. oh, and acceptance.

    I was mortified as a teen overhearing a boy comment on my "child-bearing hips" (how or where he'd heard that term I'll never know). But it is true.I have the shoulders and hips of a mittel-european peasant. When I lose weight I lose it on my waist first making my hips/shoulders appear larger! Sweet eh?

    I do notice that the excess padding reduces with clean food, (less food in general), Miranda (classical stretch--thank you danibp), and just relaxing about the whole process.

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  50. Dannie: you are so lucky, nothing will remove my belly flab, I can't afford to lose any more weight as my legs are too skinny as it is but the paunch will not budge.
    Mittel European - makes me laugh every time!

    Vanessa: we can be smock chums in our old age - if we make it that far with our lethal fat!

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  51. Very interesting and thought-provoking post. I agree also with Curator, Janet, Dani. I would suggest snacking and slacking is a problem too, most people snack mindlessly during the day at work (I've been guilty of that) and pouf! Suddenly 5 pounds appears. People can be very stagnant (esp in winter). I'll admit I'm not a gym person at all, but I try to walk as much as I can and take stairs, at least that is something!

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  52. p.s. NYC was wonderful for exercise, I walked almost everywhere on our trip and I noticed a big difference.

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  53. Sheesh,forget Apples and Pears and the rest of the fruit. I need someone to invent 'Tree trunk diet'...

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  54. LR: But it''s not just weight gain, it's about a major shape change in women. I could be 107lbs and still be apple shaped, nothing could make me a pear and that seems to be the way women are going, I need to call in the professionals on this!

    Oh Yes, NYC is much the same as over here, it's easier to walk most places than drive.

    Y: Write it, it will be a best seller.

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  55. I've been observing this for years because I used to collect vintage clothes --- you can't believe the teeny tiny waists on so many of them. It's kind of scary when you think about how quickly this transformation of our mid-sections has happened ...what will we look like in another 50 years? God help us.

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  56. Very interesting post! I get hormone testing done once a week and my endocrinologist says the belly issue comes from high cortisol (lifestyle induced stress & too much alcohol) and high estrogen levels from environmental factors like our use of plastics to package and store foods, over consumption of wheat products, and peanuts. I take DIM, a estrogen reducing supplement, and my waistline loves me for it. :)

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  59. How utterly depressing! I have such a short torso, any weight gain in the waist region translates into a overall rectangular shape. Unfortunate, to say the least!

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  60. Hi,

    There has been some interesting research about the vanishing waistline, and a lot of it points to increased stress that causes more cortisol output and consumption of foods with very little conjugated linoleic acid, which helps limit cortisol output. Cortisol leads to adding inches round one's middle (the dreaded visceral fat).

    I've got a defined waist, but I think it's mainly down to being a dreamy sort who's busy plotting books not worrying over the stuff of daily life. Also, I eat a lot of skyr that's made from milk of grass-fed cows; there's something in dairy products from grass-fed ruminants that inhibits cortisol production. So, worry less and steer clear of anything from a ruminant fed grain.

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  61. Sweetie...you have nothing to worry about...while those statistics are rather startling and sadly true for myself included...I've seen your posts where your waist and gorgeous legs are shown...I wish! I too start my day with a brutal Bar Method class for an hour and yet my waste is closer to the current stats.

    oh and another thing...I read your comment over at Hostess of the Humble Bungalow...you must never stop writing and blogging!

    xo
    annie

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  62. I have a spectacular waist...or rather I had one but have mislaid it or lost it since giving birth to 2 girls. Like you it seems to be lost under rolls of fat. Maybe I should try a unique exercise device like maybe the Shake Weight? What say you? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xXHUdvvHTkw&feature=relmfu

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  63. I've been thinking this for a long time, that even though models are really thin, they are just straight down no waisters, wonder what that is all about? You really notice is when anyone is wearing a shirt dress and there's just no definition.

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  64. While I was one of the lucky ones to have a waist, I still notice it get larger when I'm stressed. I also noticed so many figures today without waists, even when they are tiny. Please don't go away, s-curve!

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  65. I thought a Russian Twist was something the KGB performed on a deflectors neck.

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  66. My natural shape is very S curved but I've had 4 children and a lifetime of self-sabotaging habits. Now my waist is buried under the results. I don't think it's a genetics thing. I firmly believe that we have unwittingly developed a cultural system that is extremely unhealthy and essentially toxic for ourselves. From processed foods, to hidden sugars, to steroids in meats and milks, to pharmaceuticals in our drinking water from all the pharmaceuticals everyone ingest then pass into our waste system which our water treatments facilities aren't designed to clean out....It just goes on. You throw on a lifestyle with high levels of stress and we're in a hole that we have to find a way to dig ourselves out of. At least, acknowledging it gives us the shovels to start digging ourselves out.

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  67. To some extent I agree with LBF - but would add the point that the gender revolution has dented masculinity too and many men slouch around with fat bellies, sloping shoulders and frightened expressions.
    NJS

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  68. Evolution does not function in two/three generations of human time lines on identifiable physiology let alone anatomy by chemo-influences like that, not hormonally. Chemical food and plastic agents DO cause change in a person, but this is not adaptation/evolution, it is identified as irritation.
    Evolution. Arg!!!
    I wish you non-biology/genetic types would stick to your own fantasy camp dream world science fictions of how it all works rather than publically post with ignorance.
    As to anatomy. Beauty is in the eye, or In a compassionate subjective heart, and not defined ( and should not Ever be) by marketing advert types.
    You look lovely, as is Ms. T!

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  69. Tabitha, I comment this here, because I don't know if you read all the comments over at FF's blog.
    Please, don't postpone the costly bifocals, because the later you will start, the more difficult it will be to get used to glasses. It's better to start off while the difference is still small! That's what I have been told and I think it's not such a bad advice.

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  70. Hi Tabitha,
    Yes, it was Lotte Burke when I first started going in New Canaan then it switched to Bar Method founded by Burr Leonard. I do love it/hate it and it does work...but like you said in a post along time ago...it really comes down to eating...that's where I need to clean up my act.
    annie

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  71. I had a 24 inch waist once. I didn't appreciate it when I had it and now 'tis gone forever. We are a generation or two of guinea pigs we are.

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  72. I wore my original wedding ring for about 10 years. Even though I stopped wearing it ages ago (i grew to dislike the ring... the marriage didn't end) my ring finger still has a permanent indent. Yes, my finger has a waist, its decidedly more hourglass than all other digits.

    Perhaps the corset of ye olden days had similar permanent effects. Fancy lacing in to one for a few years. Science experiment.

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  73. Darn adrenal glands! One could always have a rib or two removed...isn't that what Raquel was famous for doing?
    xo J~

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  74. I've never had much of a waist, but that's due to build, about 1" between my bottom rib and the hipbone. I'd bet good money that increased carb consumption and stress are both factors in the statistical change.

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  75. I have to admit that I am one of the lucky ones to have a waist, I've never had problems in that area so far. But I have noticed how not even the models nowadays, as impossibly thin as they are, they don't have a defined waist. The hips have gotten thinner and the waist larger. xo
    Ada

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  76. Tabitha Miss KB has the hour glass but on a size 4 scale
    For years she struggled but finally at 20 is embracing her curves (sort of).
    She is an anathema to the lollipop girls our town but is kind of getting her body is ok for her.
    KateBx

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  77. Love the pun! BTW, may I add that based on the measurements you'd given me, you absolutely have an enviable hourglass figure. What I'd give to have a figure like yours.

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  78. Ugg! My darling baby who was born when I was 40 has ruined any hope of those measurements.

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  79. Oh I'm late to this party...I distinctly remember as a child my dear mother stepping into 'step-ins' everyday.
    Even then I thought this procedure alike to being placed on the rack.
    Suffice to say I cannot abide any form of control brief near my middle.
    For better or worse.
    xx

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  80. Oh dear I definitely need to get waisted!! I am doing my rehab faithfully, however tummy is NOT cooperating!

    Please Come and enter the 12 Days of Holiday giveaways! The current one is from The French Basketeer! It is stunning!

    xoxo
    Karena
    Art by Karena

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  81. My Mom has a theory that in the 1950's , when my sister and I were born and clothes dryers were scarce, her tiny waist was the result of bending and reaching to hang out endless numbers of diapers-

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  82. I think the upper torso develops more if you are involved in sports during the teenage years. It happened to me.

    I have broad shoulders, and it's not from lifting weights, but from the many hours I spent training in track & field and volleyball as a teenager.

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  83. Oh, I could go on and on about his but will not bore. I recall a waist until The Change-- always wore belts at the waist in the 90's--but I do have those kind of hips that start just below the waist ( see the J Mansfield photo). This has always been hard to fit. Pants that come below the natural waist have been a godsend for those of us with hips. I find Pilates the best for maintaining what is left of my waist-- the Dead Bug is especially good!

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  84. I fully embrace my 26” waist with clothing and that’s on a bloated day.
    I put it all down to genetics, fat placement and age though.
    I haven’t had a baby so who knows if I will have a waist after that.
    I have always had an hourglass figure, but now that I have had a breast augmentation I am more in proportion with my breasts to booty. I feel that all my fat goes to my bum.

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  85. If it's not due to heredity (and you will know, provided you got a look at your mother and grandmothers), look at diet: people are bigger now, and getting bigger all the time. If one gains below the waist, the waist also thickens. Same if you gain above.

    But I think women's bodies are beautiful whether they have indented or straight waists.

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  86. I am hourglass shaped, whether fat or thin (at the moment I am fat, thanks thyroid!). At the moment, the only people who appear hourglass shaped are those who have that shape naturally. In the 50s, anyone who wore corsetry (and that was most people) were hourglass shaped. Corsetry does train the waist if you wear it enough. Look back a bit further, to the 20s - not many hourglasses there, either.

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  87. We always want something different to what we have. That's what makes us women! I could change so much of myself if I could but two things I would keep though: brown eyes and dark hair. Brunettes rule!

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  88. Bleh. Olive Oyl was never my thinspiration either. Personally, I'm just as obsessed with the beauty of a small waist as you are. I much rather have bigger hips and thighs and butt if it means a tiny, tiny waist! And men love it ;)

    Okay and I still don't believe that you're never found a wine you liked!! Have you ever ventured onto dessert wine? I always give Moscato to even the my most hardcore wine hating friends and they quite enjoy it!

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  89. Very interesting - for the last year I have a little private fight with my waistline. I am tall, slim and getting on in years (sigh, but sparkle) - and do a lot of sport, eat very sensible - and a lot of people might say that they would like to have my worries (but I say: when a pair of trousers or a skirt pinches a bit, I think about it - and act (in a healthy way). Britta

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